Boris Johnson is right about one thing – we should never satisfy Vladimir Putin.

D.

Despite yesterday’s devastating and deserved defeat in the by-elections, Boris Johnson is right in his policy of not pleasing the Russians. Last week, the PM delivered a powerful speech just before his trip to Kyiv to meet with President Zelensky. “I’m not sure this option is really open to us,” he said bluntly. “It does not matter that leaving the Ukrainians would be morally offensive, because they are victims, and they have every right to defend a free and independent country.”

This is the last line that cannot be reduced. Even in late May, the New York Times ran an editorial entitled The War in Ukraine is Getting Complicated and America Is Not Ready, despite its excellent reporting on the war, in which it argued that It is dangerous that Ukraine could win the war. . “Russia is very strong,” he said, adding that Ukraine should make a “painful compromise” and hand over some territory to Russia. The editorial added that the United States should understand the nonsense and stop “ridiculing” Russia. This is an amazingly confident opinion to hold across the Atlantic. And it wasn’t long before similar columns were being written: that areas like Donbass should be abandoned – that Zelensky should and should make a painful compromise. President Macron has made similar signals in the past. And these ideas are very dangerous. They are based on decades of Russian propaganda and our ignorance of the Ukrainians, who do not have the PR machine developed by President Putin.

First of all, it is important to understand that the people of Ukraine have repeatedly proved that they are very different from their Russian neighbors. As a recent editorial in the Q Independent writes: “We are liberals and there have been three revolutions in less than 30 years, while the Russians have allowed themselves to be plunged into the mire of dictatorship. ۔ ” In Ukraine, there is no demand for violent power in power. They feel strong in themselves and it is in their history. According to a recent survey by the Kyiv International Sociology Institute, 82% of Ukrainians believe that Ukraine should not leave any territory for peace.

These are the people who are not afraid to remove their rulers who ignore democratic aspirations or are corrupt. The Orange Revolution was due to electoral fraud and corruption. In 2014, in the Dignity Revolution, he ousted his president at great cost, when the extraordinarily corrupt Viktor Yanukovych abruptly decided not to sign a free trade agreement with the European Union, despite The Ukrainian parliament approved it by an overwhelming majority. Instead, he chose closer ties with Russia. He is now living in exile under Putin’s protection.

Then there is the assumption that, despite the losses on the battlefield, Russia is still a superpower with a powerful army. This is another misconception created by Russian propaganda. They have suffered heavy losses – thousands of troops, vehicles, tanks and many more. Its command structure is weak, its soldiers are discouraged, and they are against the people guarding their homes, who have seen their citizens bombed, raped, hospitals demolished and children killed. Is. They will defend their freedom to the last.

And yet, we are trapped in the trap of thinking that the Russian people have been deceived by Putin into supporting this war, blinded by misinformation. Many people in Europe are believing this opinion. I heard it last week on a British stage among a panel of intelligent people – it needed a Ukrainian to straighten it out.

The Russian population is not a victim – we must not absolve them of responsibility for the war, which 70% of Russians support. He has Ukrainian family and friends who are making it clear that this is a horrific, unnecessary attack, not a “special military operation.” They have seen their squares full of protesters. They are choosing to support Putin’s war. They are not puppets of it, admit it out of fear – they can go against it if they want to.

As one Ukrainian recently told me: “In the end, Ukraine will win this war. We do not know the price or the time yet. When we did not surrender in those first days, we won.”

Our Prime Minister has never been more accurate. There can be no dialogue with Putin. Just stopped And we need to continue, even if it takes longer, to help the Ukrainians achieve this. Everything else is satisfactory.

Leader Les Tories helps rebel Johnson walk.

There the rebels will send a curse that they rushed to the no-confidence vote. Boris Johnson is technically safe for another 12 months, despite crushing defeats in Torton and Wakefield and the resignation of Tory leader Oliver Dowden today.

Johnson may be limping, or even fatally injured, but he is somehow moving.

No one on the sidelines is seriously working to speed up his demise. They are not rebels for no reason but rebels without a leader. So the Tories keep crawling as strikes and inflation rise. “We can’t do business as usual. Someone has to take responsibility,” Dowden wrote.

But we know no one will.

Help! I was bitten by a Glasto worm.

As I write this I am still talking about the Glastonbury ticket. Glasto fever has overwhelmed me, as it does every year. I have been there eight times or more and my passion does not diminish as I get older. Because whenever you enter these gates, you steal into a wild meteor that doesn’t exist anywhere else.

The first time I came in – at the age of 18 – climbing a wide wall with 20-foot drops on one side and the barking of security dogs on the other – I spent two days wandering around, watching what I saw. My eyes widened at that.

The other was for the newspaper, which reported on Glastonbury, and we stayed there for a whole week. Spend one night camping in a local farmer’s poly tunnel with his best friend, which is commonly used to grow geranium. I never wanted to leave. Each night meant traveling through another crazy tunnel of experience, singing around a campfire with Damien Hurst, dancing to a quiet disco for a few hours, waking up to other people’s tapes.

There were two tours with Vogue, a suitcase of clothes on our heads, in the mud up to our waists. And watching White Strips perform an epic gig – Meg White’s drum solo went down in Glastonbury’s musical history. I think Neil Rogers was on stage behind him when he sang Let’s Dance to the screaming crowd and he was there to give birth to my sons.

You always need to urinate, you are constantly dehydrated, tired and high, and looking for friends. Mud is terrible, you don’t sleep, you talk to strangers, you have to stop experiments that you never want to remember, and you undress in hippie gold.

Isn’t there love?