Kids at risk if speed limit isn’t lowered – says residents of busy Wicklow Road

Residents of a road near The Beehive pub where several accidents have occurred in recent years have been told by Wicklow County Council that no exceptions can be made for individual roads.

A 40-page submission has been sent to the council by residents of L1113, leading from Kilmacuragh to the Beehive pub in order to persuade the council to lower the speed limit and/or arise from concerns of a child. To introduce measures to calm the traffic on the road. A car hit.

Resident Amanda O’Sullivan said, “Such proposals were met with opposition by Wicklow County Council and some of the measures they initiated have worsened safety on this road.”

“One of the factors that ruled out the reduction in speed limits was the use of calculations based on the number of accidents on the road as a ratio of traffic volume and the prevailing average speed. We argue that the figures used at the time of the last measurement were were old and there has been an increase in accidents on this road since the completion of the M11.

While council figures mention only three collisions in the 11 years to 2016, residents are aware of nine collisions on the road since August 2018, of which at least two were hospitalized, and in which Two of them had badly damaged the bridge at the potter. The river is in need of repair by Wicklow County Council.

Using the calculations outlined in the guidelines for speed limits, residents say they have more accidents per volume of traffic on their road than the stretch in Kilmacanogee, where traffic flows to and from garages and small industrial estates. Despite the lengthy and costly construction of a separate lane over the bridge to reconnect with the national road – a 60 km/h limit still applies.

“There is no separation of traffic on our road, no second lane to avoid joining traffic, most homes are located on the left side of the road and most trips are towards Wicklow/M11, allowing both traffic directions to be at right angles.” Crossing becomes necessary. Stable, yet Wicklow County Council will not consider 60 km/h limit for our safety

“Just this Sunday we had another accident on our road and seriously on the road to the point where the largest cluster of nine houses reaches the road. There are 13 children among those nine households and it is a real concern to think that any of them could have been on the street at this time.

“Indeed this particular point is where Road 18 exits after a very wide stretch of road and where vehicles routinely accelerate while still in ‘motorway mode’.”

Ms O’Sullivan said residents are demanding a 60 km/h limit on all rural local roads that lead directly to national roads and motorways.

“This will give motorists an opportunity to moderate their driving modes and become aware of their potential to meet pedestrians, cyclists, farm machinery, pets and wildlife that they may not have encountered on motorways and national roads. Such a lower limit would be lower in instances of drivers driving at motorway speeds on roads completely unsuitable for such speeds.

“It may not deter drivers who already break the Wicklow County Council-measured limit of 50 km/h on our road, but with most drivers adhering to the speed limit, such a lower limit is normal slow.” The speed will act as traffic speed to ensure drivers switch to a driving mode more appropriate for rural road conditions. We have heard the counter argument that lower limits can lead to frustration and lead to inappropriate overtaking by drivers. may increase the danger, but drivers already break the limit and overtake in a dangerous manner and the limit should not be set for the convenience of law breakers and for the safety of those who do not.

“Indeed it appears that the majority of decision-making on speed limits favors those who are willing to risk the lives of residents and other road users for shaving a few minutes off their own travel time.

“It is an enigma that a 30 km/h limit is imposed in an urban area with sidewalks, street lighting and often ramps, but a rural road without such facilities is not even given a speed limit of twice this speed. ! Is rural life less important?

“Given the impossibility of providing sidewalks and lighting on most rural local roads, shouldn’t the speed limit at least act to facilitate passing drivers rather than to protect vulnerable road users?”

He said the increase in road accidents on Irish roads so far this year and with more than 1,000 drivers breaking the limit even on National Drive Slowly Day is a clear case for immediate action, he said.

“We are a bit unique on our road because we have become an effective bypass. There is a regional road that goes from Aughrim and Rathdrum to the N11 that goes through Glenley. Instead of exiting that road they decided to go through Rathnew. Keep the regional road leading out so that people can come across our street on the N11 because we have direct access.”

The speed limit included in the current by-laws (adopted October 2, 2017) applies to the L1113 road (which goes from the Beehive pub after Kilmacuragh).

Speed ​​limit bye-laws are in place across the country and are not different for each road so it was not possible to look at this section of road separately.

A countywide speed limit review is now underway and speed limit changes through L1113 will be considered as part of this.

The process would involve consultation with en garda ciochana, TII, and a public consultation, after which, the adoption of by-laws is a reserved function of the elected members.

A Wicklow County Council spokesman said: “The speed limit included in the current by-laws (adopted on October 2, 2017) applies to the L1113 road (which leads from Kilmacuragh to the Beehive pub). The rules are across the country and are not different for each road so it was not possible to look at this stretch of road separately.

“A countywide speed limit review is now underway and a change in speed limit through L1113 will be considered part of it.

The process would involve consultation with en garda ciochana, TII, and a public consultation, after which, the adoption of by-laws is a reserved function of the elected members.